Biofuel Solutions for LCFS Program Participants

Targray is a leading supplier of low-carbon fuels and credits for the California Low Carbon Fuel Standard (LCFS). Our low-emissions additized B99 biodiesel is suitable for customers seeking to create new efficiencies while meeting their compliance requirements.

The Low Carbon Fuel Standard promotes and enforces the use of fuels with lower carbon intensities. Certain varieties of biodiesel show significant carbon savings compared to standard diesel fuel. As a result, they can generate important tax credits for blenders. The feedstock used to make biodiesel affects the Carbon Intensity (CI) rating of the biodiesel. Indeed, some feedstocks yield a much smaller number of carbon credits than others. The resulting credits are sold per metric ton of carbon saved or avoided. The price per ton fluctuates daily and is reported by industry sources like OPIS and Argus.

In 2017, the California Air Resources Board moved away from using generic pathways to assign CI values to fuels. Since that time, values have been based on the specific practices of individual biofuel production facilities. The lower the CI, the greater the number of tax credits generated, resulting in higher savings for end users.

Low Carbon Fuel Standard CI Chart

Pathway Description Carbon Intensity Values (gCO2e/MJ)*
Conversion of Midwest soybeans to biodiesel (fatty acid methyl esters – FAME) 51.83
Conversion of waste oils (Used Cooking Oil) to biodiesel (fatty acid methyl esters – FAME) where “cooking” is required. Fuel produced in the Midwest 19.87
Conversion of North American Canola to biodiesel (fatty acid methyl esters – FAME) 50.23
Conversion of Midwest corn oil to biodiesel 28.68
Conversion of mixed tallow to biodiesel (FAME process); feedstock originates in and production occurs in the United States; cooking required 32.83

*The CI scores shown in this table are being used for indicative purposes only.

Pathway Identifier Pathway Description Carbon Intensity Values (gCO2e/MJ)
BIOD001 Conversion of Midwest soybeans to biodiesel (fatty acid methyl esters – FAME) 83.25
BIOD002 Conversion of waste oils (Used Cooking Oil) to biodiesel (fatty acid methyl esters – FAME) where “cooking” is required 15.84
BIOD003 Conversion of waste oils (Used Cooking Oil) to biodiesel (fatty acid methyl esters – FAME) where “cooking” is not required 11.76
BIOD004 Conversion of waste oils (Used Cooking Oil) to biodiesel (fatty acid methyl esters – FAME) where “cooking” is required. Fuel produced in the Midwest 18.72
BIOD005 Conversion of waste oils (Used Cooking Oil) to biodiesel (fatty acid methyl esters – FAME) where “cooking” is not required. Fuel produced in the Midwest 13.83
BIOD006 Conversion of North American Canola to biodiesel (fatty acid methyl esters – FAME) 62.99
BIOD007 Conversion of corn oil, extracted from distillers grains prior to the drying process, to biodiesel 4.00
BIOD008 Conversion of mixed tallow to biodiesel (FAME process); feedstock originates in and production occurs in the United States; cooking required 40.18

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